ISSN: 2162-9161

Editorial Board

Rob Catlett

Rob Catlett

Rob Catlett studied under Campbell R. McConnell at the University of Nebraska before joining the faculty at Emporia State University in Kansas. He thoroughly enjoys teaching a undergraduate and graduate economics courses along with an occasional first-year-experience class.

His scholarly interests range from analytical economics to academically based student civic engagement. The findings of his research are published in a variety of academic journals.

He is the Director of the ESU Centers for Economic Education and Community Research. He is associated with the American Democracy Project and is a member of the e-Citizenship Executive Committee. In addition, he is on an advisory board to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City and works with a variety of organizations far beyond the bounds of the ESU campus.

Rich Halstead-Nussloch

Rich Halstead-Nussloch, Ph.D.

Rich Halstead-Nussloch is Professor of Information Technology at Southern Polytechnic, Marietta, Georgia. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Michigan and was an early adopter of computer-based instructional technology. In the 1980′s and early 1990′s he was a senior research scientist/engineer for IBM, concentrating on the design and continuous improvement of IBM products and services with a focus on research, human-computer interaction and the human factors engineering of hardware, software, documentation, and user interfaces. Over his career, he has contributed numerous publications, computer applications and inventions and now teaches computing courses at Southern Poly and serves as the campus eGov and Electronic Citizenship Coordinator; he advises industry, education, non-profits and government in research, quality, business processes, project management, ergonomics and managing IT and computing.

Darrell A. Hamlin

Darrell Hamlin, Ph.D.

Darrell A. Hamlin is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Fort Hays State University. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Rutgers University, and a B.A. in American Studies from Baylor University. He has taught fulltime on the faculties of Rutgers University, Spring Hill College, and Fort Hays State University. A Senior Fellow at the Center for Civic Leadership at Fort Hays State University, Hamlin is also the leadership coach for students in FHSU's Honors College. His scholarship, teaching, and service have received awards, and he has been the recipient of grants for research and for educational development. As a writer, educator, consultant and coach, he focuses on civic renewal, leadership, and expanded narratives of public life.

Keisha Hoerrner

Dr. Keisha L. Hoerrner is the Dean for University College, an academic unit at Kennesaw State University that houses the Department of First-Year and Transition Studies, the Department of Leadership and Integrative Studies, and the Michael A. Leven School of Culinary Sustainability and Hospitality, the Advising Office for New and Exploratory Students in Transition (the NEST), and Orientation and Transition Programs. The college is also the academic home to the Center for Student Leadership, a shared entity that is also part of the Division of Student Affairs.

She served as the co-faculty advisor for the KSU chapter of the ONE Campaign, a national grassroots advocacy group working to end extreme poverty and hunger. She also served as the 2007 Chair of the Darfur Urgent Action Coalition of Georgia, a statewide coalition of faith-based, human rights and advocacy groups. She has held leadership roles in modern-day abolitionist organizations working to end human trafficking locally, nationally, and internationally.

Molly Kerby

Molly Kerby

Molly Kerby, MPH, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Diversity & Community Studies at Western Kentucky University and a faculty member in the Masters of Arts in Social Responsibility and Sustainable Communities (SRSC) degree program. She completed her undergraduate degree in sociology and environmental science in 1994, her master’s degree in public health/environmental health, in 1999 at Western Kentucky University, and her Ph.D. program educational leadership at the University of Louisville in 2007. Dr. Kerby’s educational and research interests have focused primarily on issues pertaining gender, community-based learning, food insecurity & place, and sustainability. In addition to her interests in traditional classroom teaching, she teaches service-learning based courses in Ireland and Belize that encourage students.

Mike Kimball

Mike Kimball, Ph.D.

Anthropologist Mike Kimball came to Northern Colorado from Maine to serve as the University of Northern Colorado’s 2007/2008 Robert O. Schulze Chair in Interdisciplinary Studies. In 2008, he became Director of UNC’s Center for Honors, Scholars, and Leadership and also holds an Associate Professor appointment in the Department of Anthropology. A 2006 recipient of the Maine Campus Compact Donald Harward Faculty Award for Service-Learning Excellence, Kimball’s work focuses on conducting and fostering engaged teaching and scholarship.

Marc Kruman

Marc Kruman

Marc W. Kruman, Director of the Center for the Study of Citizenship, is also Chair of the Department of History and Professor of History at Wayne State University. He has taught American history at Wayne State since 1975. Professor Kruman is the author of two books—”Between Authority and Liberty: State Constitution Making in Revolutionary America” (1997), and “Parties and Politics in North Carolina, 1836-1865″ (1983)—and numerous articles. He has been awarded the Andrew W. Mellon Faculty Fellowship in the Humanities at Harvard University and a National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellowship. In 1999 he was a Fulbright Senior Lecturer at the University of Rome. At Wayne State University, he has received the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Board of Governors Faculty Recognition Award (twice), and Board of Governors Distinguished Faculty Fellowship.

Peter Levine

Dr. Peter Levine

Peter Levine is the Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs in Tufts University’s Jonathan Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and Director of CIRCLE, The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement. He studied philosophy at Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, receiving his doctorate in 1992. Levine is the author of We are the Ones We have been Waiting for: The Promise of Civic Renewal in America (Oxford University Press, 2013), five other scholarly books on philosophy and politics, and a novel. He has served on the boards or steering committees of AmericaSpeaks, Street Law Inc., the Newspaper Association of America Foundation, the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools, the Kettering Foundation, the American Bar Association Committee’s for Public Education, the Paul J. Aicher Foundation, and the Deliberative Democracy Consortium.

Andrew P. Lokie, Jr

Andrew P. Lokie, Jr

Andrew Lokie is an associate professor at Missouri State University. He developed and taught a graduate Library Science course and Instructional Technology Methods course for the College of Education. His more than 20 years experience, including work at Ohio and Bucknell Universities before arriving at MSU in 2001, has involved administrating instructional technology applications across classrooms, multimedia labs, and production services. He has published articles in the Journal of Interactive Instruction Development and in the College & University Media Review. He served on the Board of Directors for the Consortium of College and University Media Centers and has presented at national conferences including the American Democracy Project, Computers In Libraries, Campus Technology, American Library Association, and Society for Applied Learning Technology. Other interests, besides family time, include hiking, rafting, gardening, yoga, and wrestling coach.

Cecilia Orphan

Cecilia Orphan

Cecilia M. Orphan is an assistant professor of higher education at the University of Denver. Her research centers on the effects of neoliberal ideology and public policy on the democratic purpose of higher education, the role of open access universities in facilitating opportunity and regional civic life, and the phenomenon of ideal-centered organizational change in higher education as well as the failure of organizational change. Prior to her doctoral program, she directed the American Democracy Project (ADP), a national multi-campus initiative of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. The 240 regional comprehensive universities involved with ADP focus on higher education's role in educating informed, engaged participants for U.S. democracy. Cecilia holds a PhD in higher education from the University of Pennsylvania and a bachelor's degree in political science from Portland State University.

John Saltmarsh

John Saltmarsh

John is the Co-Director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE) at the University of Massachusetts, Boston as well as a faculty member in the Higher Education Administration Doctoral Program in the College of Education and Human Development. He leads the project in which NERCHE serves as the administrative partner with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching for Carnegie’s elective Community Engagement Classification. He is the author, most recently, of an edited volume “To Serve a Larger Purpose:” Engagement for Democracy and the Transformation of Higher Education (2011) and a book with Edward Zlotkowski, Higher Education and Democracy: Essays on Service-Learning and Civic Engagement (2011). He holds a Ph.D. in American History from Boston University and taught for over a decade at Northeastern University and as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Feinstein Institute for Public Service at Providence College.

Mike Stout

Dr. Mike Stout

Dr. Mike Stout is an associate professor of Sociology at Missouri State University. His research interests are in the area of social capital and civic engagement. In 2010 Dr. Stout and two other MSU sociologists collaborated with the National Conference on Citizenship to produce the “Missouri Civic Health Index,” a report summarizing the empirical indicators of civic health for the state of Missouri. Dr. Stout is also the coordinator of the Ozarks Regional Social Capital Study (ORSCS), an ongoing project that tracks levels of social capital and civic engagement in Southwest Missouri. Funded by a local coalition of private, philanthropic, and public contributions the ORSCS is a valuable source of information for community and civic leaders in the Ozarks.

Joseph Zompetti

Dr. Joseph Zompetti

Joseph P. Zompetti (Ph.D.) is an associate professor in the School of Communication at Illinois State University. He has published and presented extensively on the intersection of communication and civic engagement.


Ex Officio Board Members


Rachelle Darabi

Jennifer M. Domagal-Goldman, Ph.D.

Rachelle Darabi is the Associate Provost for Student Development and Public Affairs at Missouri State University. Dr. Darabi holds a doctorate in Rhetoric and Composition with a cognate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). She held the position of Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Success at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne for nearly 20 years before coming to Missouri State University in 2008. Some of her many awards include Executive of the Year, Administrative Excellence, Outstanding Support and Service to the International Student Organization, Great Men and Women Award, and The John P. Ulmer Memorial Award in Recognition of Extraordinary Service and Long Standing Commitment to Minority and/or Disabled Students.

Jennifer Domagal-Goldman

Jennifer Domagal-Goldman

Jennifer Domagal-Goldman directs the American Democracy Project, a civic learning and democratic engagement network of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). She earned her doctorate in higher education from the Pennsylvania State University. She received her master's degree in higher education and student affairs administration from the University of Vermont and a bachelor's degree from the University of Rochester. Jennifer's dissertation focused on how faculty learn to incorporate civic learning and engagement in their undergraduate teaching within their academic discipline, for which she received the 2011 IARSLCE honorable mention dissertation award. Jennifer holds an ex-officio position on the eJournal of Public Affairs' editorial board. She has contributed to a number of democratic engagement publications including authoring or co-authoring chapters in Reimagining Democratic Societies: A New Era of Personal and Social Responsibility (2013) and Becoming a Steward of Place: Four Areas of Institutional Focus (2014), as well as co-authoring a chapter on institutional characteristics and student civic outcomes in Research on Student Civic Outcomes in Service Learning: Conceptual Frameworks and Methods (2016).

Kris Sutliff

Kris Sutliff

Kris Sutliff is a Fellow in the Society for Technical Communication and Professor Emeritus of English at Missouri State University, where she taught Technical and Professional Writing from 1979 to 2016. She also directed the Center for Ozarks Studies and served as Student Academic Ombudsman as well as Assistant Head of the English Department and Coordinator of Technical & Professional Writing. She has received multiple awards for Teaching and Service from Missouri State University and the MSU College of Arts & Letters. Other awards include the Curtis P. Lawrence Award for Excellence in Academic Advising, Outstanding Graduate Student Mentor, Outstanding Thesis Advisor, and the J R Gould Award for Excellence in Teaching Technical Communication.